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School Publications

 

Engaging Hard-to-reach
Families
How English schools create effective home-school
partnerships
Peter Verstappen
Abstract
This paper reports findings from a study trip to England and the USA in 2011 to investigate how schools and
education systems improve the engagement of students from marginalised or hard-to-reach families. The report
describes successful strategies observed in a range of primary and secondary schools, most of which serve
communities with high numbers of hard-to-reach families. Consideration is given to the reasons why some
families and communities are estranged from mainstream education, including socio-economic factors, culture
and religion. Special reference is made to the experience of Gypsy/Traveller students in English schools and to
ways in which schools are using digital resources, particularly online learning environments, to bridge the gap
between school and home.
Examples of good practice are discussed within a model of successful home-school partnerships drawn from the
work of Epstein (2001) in the USA, Biddulph et al (2003) in New Zealand, and others. The experiences of
English and American educators are compared to New Zealand settings and strategies, and the report seeks to
give practical advice to teachers, school leaders, parents and community members who seek to improve the
home-school partnership.

Engaging Hard-to-reach Families

How English schools create effective home-school partnerships

Peter Verstappen


This paper reports findings from a study trip to England and the USA in 2011 to investigate how schools and 
education systems improve the engagement of students from marginalised or hard-to-reach families. The report describes successful strategies observed in a range of primary and secondary schools, most of which serve communities with high numbers of hard-to-reach families. Consideration is given to the reasons why some families and communities are estranged from mainstream education, including socio-economic factors, culture and religion. Special reference is made to the experience of Gypsy/Traveller students in English schools and to ways in which schools are using digital resources, particularly online learning environments, to bridge the gap between school and home.

Examples of good practice are discussed within a model of successful home-school partnerships drawn from the work of Epstein (2001) in the USA, Biddulph et al (2003) in New Zealand, and others. The experiences of English and American educators are compared to New Zealand settings and strategies, and the report seeks to give practical advice to teachers, school leaders, parents and community members who seek to improve the home-school partnership.

To read the full article please click here.

 

 

Learning - the Wakefield Way

In this booklet you will find information about Wakefield School curriculum - it captures what we do around here and what we want for our children's education.  It has some big statements of our beliefs and values and some more detailed descriptions of how learning happens.  The ideas and words in the booklet have been gathered over a long period and many conversations among parents, staff, students and community.  Some of these ideas are already very much part of what happens at Wakefield School, others are things we are still becoming but we have enough confidence in both the ideas and our ability to make them happen to commit them to paper.

Peter Verstappen 

This parent booklet will have alot of usual information you might require to understand Wakefield School, to find the booklet please click here